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Image for Getting into The Peel – a complicated guide

Getting into The Peel – acomplicated guide

Back in 2007, Melbourne’s The Peel Hotel made international headlines with its legally-enforced and controversial door policy. Five years later, getting into the venue is still difficult… if you’re a woman.

The Peel had won a landmark case allowing it to legally refuse entry to heterosexual people. Sorry girls – no more hen’s nights. It was a first-of-its-kind decision in Australia and thought to be unique across the globe, as the venue’s owner sought to ensure his beloved bar remained a gay male-focused nightspot.

Last year that exemption to anti-discrimination laws was renewed, but to comply with privacy protection provisions of Victoria’s Charter of Human Rights, staff at the venue were simply advised they could no longer ask about someone’s sexuality at the door.

The Peel’s owner Tom McFeely insists his staff must still deny access to anyone they feel threatens the safety or comfort of patrons inside “or its position as an openly gay venue.”

As women continue to find themselves turned away from The Peel – or getting forced to line up outside while men are waved on through – frustration with the situation has spilled out onto Facebook where an End the sexist door policy at the Peel group now numbers 500 people. Many of the group’s members are upset that their female friends are being turned away from the venue on its busier nights, and accuse McFeely of “thinly-veiled misogyny”.

“The Peel is one of the few accessible (free) queer venues in Melbourne,” the group’s creator points out. “It is shameful that women (queer or otherwise) are bullied and humiliated on the street.”

McFeely took the criticism seriously, taking out full-page ads in local gay media, endeavoring to explain the bar’s policies.

“Let me state clearly and without apology that The Peel is a venue provided for gay men – and NOT for everyone,” he thundered. “Keeping it gay has never been an easy task, and it has ALWAYS generated controversy.

“The comfort, enjoyment, and safety of gay males is The Peel’s PRIME Directive.”

But what about their female friends or lesbians seeking a fun night out? “Another misconception is that gay male regulars cannot come to The Peel with friends. This is NOT the case,” McFeely’s missive continues. “They can. However, everyone is required to respect The Peel’s Prime Directive, and sometimes this may mean some people are asked to queue or to adjust certain behaviour.”

Speaking of ‘certain behaviour’, The Peel now gets specific about all this and more on its official website. Study all the rules below…

McFeely says the responses he’s had to The Peel’s door policies have varied widely from “a humbling and overwhelming show of support and encouragement,” to a “continual onslaught of legal threats and personal attacks.”

But it seems he’s not backing down anytime soon. The former Liberal Party candidate tells Same Same he acknowledges how controversial his rules are but he’s sticking with them.

“With regard to women and everyone else who is not a gay man, I would hope they take the time to digest my message and respect myself and my team for standing up for what we believe in,” he explains. “As well as this, The Peel is private business. Should we for example, demand that Suzanne’s clothing stores start stocking men’s Jocks?”

Heterosexual punters are well catered for with other Melbourne venues, so can very easily enjoy a night out with the lads or girls – but gay guys really benefit from having their own unique space to be themselves in, McFeely suggests.

“Although many individuals in society did not enjoy a well nurtured childhood, I would argue that in most part they were probably surrounded by a family that was essentially the same as them,” he elaborates. “But a lot of gay people grew up having to listen to disparaging names and insults being thrown around the living room when someone with a ‘lisp’ was on the telly, at the same time knowing it would have been impossible to even broach the subject of being gay. At least a black child doesn’t have to ‘come out’ to his black family for being black in the hope they are accepted.

“Perhaps this is why so many in the community refer to others as ‘family’. For many years now the customers and staff alike have been my family. One does what one has to protect their family, and I’m doing the same.”


Is The Peel’s door policy unnecessarily discriminatory, or simply protecting the interests of its gay punters as best it can? We welcome your thoughts below.

Social

Comments

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mjw88

mjw88 said on the 18th Apr, 2012

I can't get behind this for so many reasons. The first being because they've used "you're" instead of "your".

Phazz

Phazz said on the 18th Apr, 2012

I think this is an awful rule. You can't argue equality, yet deny others equal treatment.

mark_

mark_ said on the 18th Apr, 2012



:rolleyes: I don't argue equality.

And I really agree with that fourth sign about excess noise in the courtyard and about how the neighbours have to suffer with it.

Drunk people talk and laugh much louder than sober people. They trouble is they don't realise that it's louder. People with dementia are EXACTLY the same.

aldwynbrian

aldwynbrian said on the 18th Apr, 2012

OK after years and years of being knocked back in clubs because I was too effeminate. Gay venue is Gay venue thanks. I really dont want straight gals and guys making fun of me in a place I really feel safe in.Please Gay does not mix with druncken straight.

someoneinatree

someoneinatree said on the 18th Apr, 2012

I find some of it misogynistic - the "know your place; shut your face" sign in particular is clearly targeting women, and it does so in an offensive manner.

I also think it is a sad world where "expressions of non gay male sexuality" are automatically deemed offensive to or necessarily discomforting for gay men. If the wider population of gay men does find non gay-male sexuality (expressed without aggression or invasion of space) offensive, then I find it an indictment on our maturity. I feel the same way when gay men are grossed out when anyone talks about female sexuality or genitalia generally. Grow-up gentlemen.

Finally, some of the wording is deliberately ambiguous (such as wearing clothing that is "unsuitable or unsafe"), which can easily lead to accusations of unspoken bias when different staff interpret this differently. The classic example people use is open-toed shoes. If it's ok for a drag queen to wear them, it should be ok for a cis-gendered female to wear them. If you want to police what people wear, have a dress code and state it clearly.

Having said all that, I'm fine with the principle that it is a venue predominantly for gay men. The banning of behaviour that is homophobic or that treats gay male sexuality as a spectacle (hens nights in particular) is perfectly logical.

The prioritisation of entry also makes sense, but only when the venue is already nearing capacity. Policing strict door policies when the venue is near empty is always ridiculous.

It is the occasionally offensive language used and the extremity, and unreliability, of its policing of the issue that is really the core problem here.

mark_

mark_ said on the 18th Apr, 2012


Are you personally offended or are you choosing to take offence for some kind of theoretical ideal of political correctness?

Sydney had many, many venues like Nevermind, and Arq who gave up their core clientele in order to chase the dollar.


.

Doolander

Doolander said on the 18th Apr, 2012

I say good on him... Yes, gay men DESERVE their own space. Is it offensive, probably, but I think that depends on who you ask.

Probably no more offensive (and certainly nowhere near as dangerous) as when gay men want to 'be themselves' in a straight venue and risk themselves at the attitudes of potentially dangerous and threatening straight males.
If people don't like it, don't go. Simple.

This is probably not a venue I would frequent. I prefer the pub setting, and to be honest am not that threatened by straight males. But everyone is different, this club is clearly a 'haven' for gay men who are not comfortable in other surroundings.

Puggsie

Puggsie said on the 18th Apr, 2012

Misogynist bastard, sorry I am not a straight woman nor an agressive dyke. I have attended this bar for many years and made some beautiful gay male friends and if something were a miss I would happily jump up and defend them. To hear that women are there to chase guys and that lesbians attack gay men - grow up. Bogan heans nights and drunken blokes are the reason we have security at these venues - this is not a valid excuse for having a discriminatory door policy.

If you dont like straights, lesbians and women in general just say it and stop hiding behind the...."gay males need my protection" motif.
This I would respect more.

Personally I would not want to attend a place where people had such narrow minds anyway.

chimpy

chimpy said on the 18th Apr, 2012

Shut your face, know your place and included a picture of a hysterical women! You would think a cunt would let cunts in.

someoneinatree

someoneinatree said on the 18th Apr, 2012

Are you personally offended or are you choosing to take offence for some kind of theoretical ideal of political correctness?

Sydney had many, many venues like Nevermind, and Arq who gave up their core clientele in order to chase the dollar.


.

First of all: I hate the term "political correctness" as people seem to use it as a pejorative. There is nothing "politically correct" about expecting people not to denigrate others on the basis of their gender, race, sexuality, sex, or religion: it's basic human decency, and I would hope many people aspire to treat others with respect.

To answer your question, I don't think I'm personally offended by it. It just saddens me when other people feel the need to express things in ways that are disrespectful or unnecessarily rude.

All that final sign needs to say is: "Please respect our neighbours and keep noise levels down when in the courtyard. People making excessive noise may be asked to go inside, or in extreme cases, be asked to leave the venue." Instead we are subjected to something that I guess was meant to be humorous but fails dismally and can easily be interpreted as misogynist.

BrendanD

BrendanD said on the 18th Apr, 2012

Best phrase ever "The Peel is private business. Should we for example, demand that Suzanne%u2019s clothing stores start stocking men%u2019s Jocks?%u201D

gauche

gauche said on the 18th Apr, 2012

Actually, men are allowed to shop at Suzanne's and if a drag queen was kicked out of a women's clothing shop I would go protest and defend everyone's right to shop there. Analogy fail.

It's totally fair to ban hen's nights and have that as a stated policy. I like going to Sircuit on their mixed nights and I have no problem with the fact that they are a men's-only venue for most of the week. The issue with the Peel is that they are inconsistent and vague.

Travis de Jonk

Travis de Jonk said on the 18th Apr, 2012

The Peel is a tricky one. Like it or loathe it, it's an icon of the gay scene in Melbourne. But it is terribly inconsistent with it's delivery of door policy. Something I've experienced first hand. Every other club / bar in Melbourne seems have a very simple clear policy. The Laird and Sircuit for example are respected and supported across the diversity community despite being largely men only - becuase they are consistent with their policies. The Peel policies seem to upset a lot of people, and the feed back I get is that people feel used. The whole situation is a real shame, because I actually think the venue is quite awesome, especially now with the renos. And it serves an important purpose for Melbourne's gay men. By the way, Since I took on the Melbourne editor role, I've been looking for a regular photographer to cover the venue for our scene guide. And no one ever wants to do it, even if i pay them. So if anyone is interested, contact me!

wysi

wysi said on the 18th Apr, 2012

where is this unheard-of place?

Travis de Jonk

Travis de Jonk said on the 18th Apr, 2012

I'm very lucky to have friends of all genders and sexualities - yes even straight friends who are beautiful and supportive and accepting of our community. I love their company and would rather go to a place where they are welcome.

I don't know how you all feel, but the only people I don't want in our clubs are trouble makers and homophobes. Ignorance and a bad attitude has nothing to gender, race or sexuality, and simply needs to be assessed like every other club does.

TheOldie

TheOldie said on the 18th Apr, 2012

The man comes across as a pig.

I just dont understand why people want to force themselves in the door. I'd say fuck and give my business elsewhere.

Dont we still have Fernwood Gyms ? why would a man try and force himself in their door.

Some people do need a male only space/female only space so let them.

Virgindirk

Virgindirk said on the 18th Apr, 2012

I fully support this door policy.

Until it is safe for gay men to 'be themselves' in straight bars and clubs (dont hold your breath), the Peel's door policy is still valid. Gay men have a right to go a venue and feel safe and comfortable without being ridiculed,judged, harrassed or threatened by straight men or women. And before any lesbians get thier knickers in a knot, I would fully support and respect a female only/priorty door policy at any venues that cater to same sex attracted women.

simplekj

simplekj said on the 18th Apr, 2012

i agree with this rule and i think Sydney gay clubs should be able to apply some of these rules!!!
The Peel has stuck with its guns and look at it now. its still a gay venue..
Look at ARQ, its letting all these straight guys and their girlfriends in and now its infested with them!
I don;t even go to ARQ anymore because its soo full of homophobic straight people, guys and girls!!
You try and hit on a guy and then he gets all aggressive and abusive using language liek "FUCK OFF! I'M NOT A FAG"..
wow.. could've fooled me since youre also topless and in a gay club!!!
I;ve heard girls complaining about how its so gross cause there were all these gays kissing..
HELLO? its a gay club!!!
I dont know why they're complaining about being singled out. They have the whole city and its venues to go to and yet they sitll want to bitch and moan about being treated unfairly..

I mean I dont mind a few girls and I love bringing my straight gfs to a night out but a hens night is too much.
We're not zoo animals here for you to observe and laugh at..
Last weekend I was told by a straight girl at a gay venue that I wasn't allowed to go into the ladies toilets..
She continued to run her mouth as if she owned the place.

I think The Peel should loosen up and make it a gay and lesbian venue as well cause our lesbian friends are also subjected to the same kinds of discrimination as us!

HubbaHubba

HubbaHubba said on the 18th Apr, 2012

Geez, the complainers wold think this was the only pub in the world. Go to another pub if they don't want you there. Stop being a victim and save your outcry for real discrimination when you lose your job or get evicted or bashed for who you are not because some pub doesn't cater to you. Let the boys hav their pub and the girls can have their fernwood gyms.

MrAsh

MrAsh said on the 18th Apr, 2012



I say good on him... Yes, gay men DESERVE their own space. Is it offensive, probably, but I think that depends on who you ask.

Probably no more offensive (and certainly nowhere near as dangerous) as when gay men want to 'be themselves' in a straight venue and risk themselves at the attitudes of potentially dangerous and threatening straight males.
If people don't like it, don't go. Simple.

This is probably not a venue I would frequent. I prefer the pub setting, and to be honest am not that threatened by straight males. But everyone is different, this club is clearly a 'haven' for gay men who are not comfortable in other surroundings.

I agree Doolander and I'm not threatened by straight guys either. To be honest I get along with straight guys because most are respectful and aren't so absorbed with themselves that they want to constantly be the focus of attention or look over their shoulder to see if something better is coming along.

Also it's different strokes for different folks. Some people need a space where they can be around their own gender/sexuality and some don't and prefer it mixed. There needs to be options for both, that's diversity.

Correz

Correz said on the 19th Apr, 2012

It has been a couple of years since I last ventured as far south as the Peel. But the same situation was reflected a few years ago at the Shift in Sydney when they had a policy favouring gay men. Back then even the girls in our groups understood that it was better for a gay venue to make some attempt at controlling the door instead of opening it up to Hen's nights or to straight girls dragging their homo-unfriendly bfs back to where they had a great time at the last Hen's night.

I suspect that Travis is on the ball citing that it is the inconsistency of the policy that gets up the nose of many punters. I think it%u2019s quite reasonable for gay venues to apply a 'men-only' or 'women-only' policy to ensure the safety and comfort of customers. Saunas for example are exclusively male and we don't read too many articles about women being offended because they are turned away from these venues.

The tricky thing is when they 'sometimes' let girls into gay male venues and vice versa. If so should they give preference to girls in the company of gay guys? Should they give preference to gay-girls on their own ? All this based of course on a perception of the sexuality of the punters requesting access since the venue (now) can't legally ask. Tricky! The best thing that venues like the Peel can do is make it clear that they will give preference to gay men and then apply the door policy as consistently as they can.

Irene

Irene said on the 19th Apr, 2012

I can't see what the issue is. It's a place for gay guys, not for their hanger-onnerers be they lesbian, straight women or straight men. It would be nice if there was a place which was exclusively for lesbians, but there isn't - that's not the fault of The Peel. IMO, he should just ban all women - that would solve most of his problems. Yeah, the guy comes across as a bit of a pig - but it's his business. If people haven't got better things to whinge about, they should butt out 'cause they've got it pretty good.

mark_

mark_ said on the 19th Apr, 2012



http://forum.justusboys.com/forum/images/smilie/thumbsup.gif
Why can't the whingers put on their own party in their own homes.
They can have their own choice of music and they won't be so offensive so many people

Marko

Marko said on the 19th Apr, 2012

Ummm...what constitutes "Expressions of non gay male sexuality?" I think I'd be genuinely turned away from this place if I tried to get in lol.

joejoe84

joejoe84 said on the 19th Apr, 2012

Whilst I found some of the screeching hen-party types annoying, it was never the women that stopped me from going to the Peel. For me, it was the over-inflated drinks prices and stuck-up gay-scene kids, who either look down their noses it at you, or can't hold a conversation without throwing in tired innuendo every second phrase.

moose6969

moose6969 said on the 19th Apr, 2012

I agree with the policy, cos gay males need somewhere to go, without being threatened or intimidated by other males. In Adelaide, the gay nightclub is Mars Bar. In Melbourne, muslim women have got the Melbourne Baths to themselves, 1 day of the week, so why cant gay males etc have their own place to meet etc.

papoose

papoose said on the 19th Apr, 2012

Gay men are always excluding gay women from their venues. I can only think of one instance that a gay female event excludes men, and I think it was reactionary. Not interested in going to either. For sure, turn away hen parties - not even most straight people want to deal with them, but I won't attend something that excludes other genders or races. I only attend mixed events.

I was also wondering - how does the anti-women door policy at The Peel affect transgendered patrons? Is one welcome if they are FtM? Or can MtFs enter if they flash some pre-op genitals for proof? What's the deal there? What if you identify as neither - how do the bouncers deal with that one?

NATEE

NATEE said on the 23rd Apr, 2012

Thank god I live in Sydney lol

Virgindirk

Virgindirk said on the 23rd Apr, 2012



its in sydney where people are complaing that the 'straights'are taking over Oxford st and venues like Arq, columbian and Midnight Shift are becoming too much of a 'mixed venue' rather than a gay venue.

Go figure.

NATEE

NATEE said on the 23rd Apr, 2012

Hmm. Straights are everywhere they are the majority, besides Oxford street is right next to the CBD of Sydney. What do you expect it to be, all gay lol!! Sorry but the Pet Shop Boys cannot take Sydney that far west.

NATEE

NATEE said on the 23rd Apr, 2012

its in sydney where people are complaing that the 'straights'are taking over Oxford st and venues like Arq, columbian and Midnight Shift are becoming too much of a 'mixed venue' rather than a gay venue.

Go figure.


Still Sydney is keeping its gay clubs, with high gay patrons. It is centralised in the one area as well as very accessible to the gay community. Also the gay parties and festivals the gay community throws in Sydney. No complaints so far about those. Well besides the drugs and booze lol

Some gay clubs in Sydney are mixed just like around the world. Why restrict your patrons. Keeps things interesting and not boring. I guess that could be the reason why 3 of the 4 gay clubs in Melbourne Shut Down!

Virgindirk

Virgindirk said on the 23rd Apr, 2012

Still Sydney is keeping its gay clubs, with high gay patrons. It is centralised in the one area as well as very accessible to the gay community. Also the gay parties and festivals the gay community throws in Sydney. No complaints so far about those. Well besides the drugs and booze lol

Some gay clubs in Sydney are mixed just like around the world. Why restrict your patrons. Keeps things interesting and not boring. I guess that could be the reason why 3 of the 4 gay clubs in Melbourne Shut Down!

NATEE, you need to open your eyes and ears abit more, there are constant complaints about oxford st and how its loss its true gay ghetto vibe and many business that have gone from being gay venues to mixed, not to mention the amount of straight venues popping up in the area. Even festivals like Mardi Gras get stung with critisim from the GLBTI community that its too commercialised and too 'straight freindly'.

What 3 out of 4 melbourne gay clubs got shut down? The only gay nightclub that has closed in recent years is the Market.

NATEE

NATEE said on the 24th Apr, 2012

NATEE, you need to open your eyes and ears abit more, there are constant complaints about oxford st and how its loss its true gay ghetto vibe and many business that have gone from being gay venues to mixed, not to mention the amount of straight venues popping up in the area. Even festivals like Mardi Gras get stung with critisim from the GLBTI community that its too commercialised and too 'straight freindly'.

What 3 out of 4 melbourne gay clubs got shut down? The only gay nightclub that has closed in recent years is the Market.

Once again Virgin you are missing the point, of course it will eventually lead to a mixed venue, that in a way is inevitable. A lot of heterosexuals are becoming tolerant and understanding towards homosexuality. It is not up to us to refuse people based on sexuality that is very primitive and discriminative. As I said a lot of 'gay' club promoters in Sydney do other things to entice gay patrons rather then just your average every saturday night clubbing, where heterosexual girls bring their heterosexual male friends. For example festivals such as Daywash, Love Muscle, Homesexual, MIA, Stonewall with their male competitions and etc. Those places are usually 90% gay guys.

Even heterosexual venues like the Beresford promote to a homosexual audience. For most clubs it is about business and what will bring in business and customers. Most gay venues in Sydney like Nevermind, Shift, Stonewall, Slides, have still a highly significant amount of gay blokes that go. Arq is probably one of the only ones that is mixed up especially on Saturday nights.

Mardi gras is straight friendly, because huge numbers of heterosexuals are accepting towards homosexuals. Knowing that ones sexuality does not make a person any different. Why be entirely exclusive when we have the ability to be inclusive for all different types of people.

Unfortunately this Peel hotel in MELBOURNE is stuck in an era where discrimination was much higher and fear and intimidation controlled peoples mind set about homosexuals.

Still, personally I would prefer to live in Sydney. Seems gay and straight friendly to me. Why ask for civil rights if we (as homosexuals including this Peel Hotel) are not practicing what we preach.

My apologies on that, I did hear other gay venues close in melbourne as well.

Brightside05

Brightside05 said on the 24th Apr, 2012

its in sydney where people are complaing that the 'straights'are taking over Oxford st and venues like Arq, columbian and Midnight Shift are becoming too much of a 'mixed venue' rather than a gay venue.

Go figure.

The old queens see one straight guy and whine.

MrAsh

MrAsh said on the 24th Apr, 2012



The funny thing is that the hot guys around Oxford Street on Friday and Saturday nights are usually the ones lining up to get into the 'straight' venues.

NATEE

NATEE said on the 24th Apr, 2012



Ohh please at least we still welcome them in the clubs in Sydney and not kick them out like second class citizens like Melbourne. Sounds like the Melbourne queens are whinging more often. Lol

Virgindirk

Virgindirk said on the 24th Apr, 2012



I have a feeling you've got something against Melbourne

wysi

wysi said on the 24th Apr, 2012

I think this must be moved to the Melbourne thread.

Virgindirk

Virgindirk said on the 25th Apr, 2012



Yeah, too much melbourne talk for the precious sydney queens to handle.

wysi

wysi said on the 25th Apr, 2012



melbourne is a hole. ;)

Virgindirk

Virgindirk said on the 25th Apr, 2012



'hole lot better than sydney:p

wysi

wysi said on the 25th Apr, 2012



you can take our monorail.

NATEE

NATEE said on the 25th Apr, 2012

Now lets not attack Melbourne its not fair. However.....

wysi

wysi said on the 25th Apr, 2012

lol but i'm from sydney!

NATEE

NATEE said on the 25th Apr, 2012



Once again it does not surprise me that Melbourne is bad mouthing Sydney with no evidence to back it up. I was not attacking Melbourne.

Just the Club in Melbourne. Unfortunately you are proving that by attacking other cities, partly shows how insecure and pretentious the gay culture can be in Melbourne. I do admit Sydney gays do have their moments but are actually pretty laid back. Just chill out a bit lol

Just remember the world is moving forward on these issues. We are moving away from the time of contemporary Australia to 21ST century Australia. Sydney is able to adapt to accommodate for every one not just for the gay culture.

I am sure Melbourne can do the same. Would be beneficial for all.

P.S: the monorail was innovative for its time. Now they are getting rid of it for more Underground railway . For the new railway line, the north west rail link which will attach to the CBD relief line.

NATEE

NATEE said on the 25th Apr, 2012



I know but Melbournians get really defensive if you say one bad little thing. They can attack Sydney who cares at least we are happy :) And thank god for our railway :) lol

NATEE

NATEE said on the 25th Apr, 2012

By the way I do think Melbourne is a nice place. Been there plenty of times.

beckvee

beckvee said on the 26th Apr, 2012

its not the city, its the fuckn idiots that ruin it, i was born and bred in melb. and its a alternative but classy and interesting place with many things to offer. sydney been there once, is a beautiful place love the harbour and surrounds. Each city to there own, positives and negatives for sure, most of the negatives come from the dickheads that live there, sarcastic and up their own ass's .

beckvee

beckvee said on the 26th Apr, 2012

well there you go.....topic changed from the peel to two citys bickering over who is better, see what i mean, idiots , keep your throb nights and foam party's under your collers, sit down somewhere and you might fall pregnant

cal_t

cal_t said on the 26th Apr, 2012

I think ban the racist fags and let the women in ;p

mark_

mark_ said on the 27th Apr, 2012


I agree. One should aspire to be decent. But the PC Laws become onerous when they're used so heavy-handedly by Gillard's Government et al. that they seem so much like Fascist Social Engineering.

crazzymikey

crazzymikey said on the 27th Apr, 2012

Gay men are always excluding gay women from their venues. I can only think of one instance that a gay female event excludes men, and I think it was reactionary. Not interested in going to either. For sure, turn away hen parties - not even most straight people want to deal with them, but I won't attend something that excludes other genders or races. I only attend mixed events.

I was also wondering - how does the anti-women door policy at The Peel affect transgendered patrons? Is one welcome if they are FtM? Or can MtFs enter if they flash some pre-op genitals for proof? What's the deal there? What if you identify as neither - how do the bouncers deal with that one?

what a load of crap! lesbians are more hard core in keeping me n out than gay men keeping women out. generalising of course but there is always that small contingent who are loud. in the past at mardi gras it was a few of the lesbians insisting on having women only spaces not the gay guys. get your facts straight! I have seen many womens only nights over the years I am yet to see an mens only night insydney

crazzymikey

crazzymikey said on the 27th Apr, 2012

Nothing wrong with a gay mens club tryign to keeo it that way.

most straight clubs in sydney refuse entry to men over women because the clubs with more women pick up better trade. is this sexist? perhaps but it is happening.

why is it when one gay club tries to keep its clientele gay it is under so much attack. straights have their pick of vnues to frequent and there are other gay venues that will have mixed crods. get over it and stop whinging.


after seeing what arq and colombian, phoenix and nwow shift have become I would welcome this policy here in sydney too. I was shocked at how much our venues are predominantly straight now. when was the last time some of you went to arq, colombian or phoenix? I wont step foot in arq its dangerous. :eek:

crazzymikey

crazzymikey said on the 27th Apr, 2012



I thought you were from canada 'ey? :confused:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FEW5mh7iAI

b-ry

b-ry said on the 27th Apr, 2012

i think this creating an atmosphere of segregation, and not exactly helping the plight of equality. Fight battles where battles need to be fought.

Irene

Irene said on the 28th Apr, 2012

Haven't checked this thread for a while, but I had to laugh at Natee. He's the only one discussing Sydney vs Melbourne. Then he comes up with "Once again it does not surprise me that Melbourne is bad mouthing Sydney with no evidence to back it up. I was not attacking Melbourne." What??? :confused:

Sep77

Sep77 said on the 1st May, 2012

I visited The Peel for the first time this Saturday, and I must say that the explanation letter, along with the posters on the walls, had the most appalling punctuation and general language in English of any bar I've visited - including those overseas. As a venue, though, it wasn't half bad.

Tigerland

Tigerland said on the 30th Sep, 2012

The Peel hasn't been any good for years now.

dougster

dougster said on the 30th Sep, 2012

Nothing wrong with a gay mens club tryign to keeo it that way.

most straight clubs in sydney refuse entry to men over women because the clubs with more women pick up better trade. is this sexist? perhaps but it is happening.

why is it when one gay club tries to keep its clientele gay it is under so much attack. straights have their pick of vnues to frequent and there are other gay venues that will have mixed crods. get over it and stop whinging.


after seeing what arq and colombian, phoenix and nwow shift have become I would welcome this policy here in sydney too. I was shocked at how much our venues are predominantly straight now. when was the last time some of you went to arq, colombian or phoenix? I wont step foot in arq its dangerous. :eek:

yeah have 2 agree with crazy. dont mind mixed clubs but sometimes leik 2 go 2 a gay only space so i dont feel leik i'm on show when i'm kissing the boyf. woodn't go near arq again 2 many str8s & 2 much attitude. if oxford st was ever gay, it aint much anymore.