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Can We Learn to Love Anyone ?

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GCDOC +

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Default Can We Learn to Love Anyone ?
What’s wrong with the way we approach love?
For most Westerners, our relationships are the one area of our lives that we are happy to leave entirely to chance. We plan our education, our careers, our finances, our retirement, but we’re still uncomfortable with the idea that we should plan our love lives. Yet, for many centuries, romantic love was viewed as a form of madness, and passion wasn’t considered a legitimate basis for marriage until recent times.


Why do we place such an emphasis on passion?
The problem starts with fairy tales. They foster some very resilient myths. The myth of happily ever after, for example, creates expectations about what’s supposed to happen in a relationship — expectations that are virtually impossible to meet. The myth of The One is another very destructive fallacy. We believe The One is out there for us, if only we can find him or her. We think once we find The One, he or she will never change, and neither will we.


How do these myths affect us?
They influence how we select a partner. If you think you love someone right away, you’re in love with an idealised version of the person, or, like Shakespeare’s Duke Orsino, you’re just ‘in love with love’. The fairy tales encourage us to look for the lightning bolt, but relationships based on this kind of phenomenon almost always end in tatters — historically, this kind of instantaneous bond was seen as a kind of madness. Also, when our expectations are violated — when our partner cheats or gains weight or stops sleeping with us — we get depressed or angry. We rarely put in the effort needed to keep things going.


If we accept that our current model for finding love doesn’t work, is there another model that does?
Sixty per cent of the world’s marriages are arranged by matchmakers or parents, and in perhaps half of these marriages, people learn to love each other over time. A study conducted in India in the 1980s compared the strength of feelings of partners in love matches to those of partners in arranged marriages. The ‘love’ in love matches started to fade after about two years, but the love in the arranged marriages grew gradually, surpassing the love in the love marriages at about the five-year mark. Ten years on, the love in the arranged marriages was twice as strong.


But what about sexual attraction?
Physical attraction is important, especially early on in a relationship. But it’s also important to know how to distinguish lust from love. When physical attraction is too strong, it can be blinding, and many people who think they are in love are actually just in lust.



How do we begin to take control over our love lives?
First, we need to accept that there is no one ‘right’ partner predestined for us. The soulmate myth is rubbish, and harmful. We need to look around us with new eyes, new assumptions and new skills.


So we can learn to love anyone?
I don’t believe you can fall in love with absolutely anyone, but there are many people around us with whom we could very deliberately create lasting love. Two people need to be basically compatible and at least somewhat attracted to each other. Given these basic requirements — which each of us shares, most likely, with thousands of other people — two people can learn to love if, first, they make a strong commitment to do so, second, they agree not to date other people while they are developing their relationship, and third, they engage in various love-promoting activities (such as reading about love) to develop openness and fondness for one another.


Surely it’s not as easy as simply widening the field of suitable people?
No, certainly not. We also need to think about whether we believe that love is a magical, mystical thing over which we have no control, or whether there are skills we can learn that will help us. Recent studies in Mexico, Italy and the UK are revealing neurological and chemical correlates of the love state; mental health professionals have developed powerful tools for fostering love, and researchers are getting better at predicting success in relationships. The biggest myth of all about love is that it can’t be studied scientifically.


Doesn’t your method make falling in love a calculated commodity? Isn’t this a more prosaic alternative to ‘real’ love?
Passionate love is already a commodity, sold to us by film-makers, novelists and songwriters. Unfortunately, it’s sold to us in a form that is both unrealistic and inaccessible to most people. I’m proposing that we put romantic love on a steadier footing. It’s depressing to think that ‘real’ love has to choose you. I’m too much of an optimist to leave any form of happiness to chance
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I kind of get what you are saying. When I was young I had the expectation that relationships were fast paced and would always be fun because thats how it happens in movies. It is a very unrealistic and unhealthy point of view. I think that is why there are soo many people swinging from lover to lover these days.
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A man can be happy with any woman as long as he does not love her. - Oscar Wilde
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I do kind of agree with the OP's suggestion.

Our hormones make us fall in love with a lover in a few short years after the hormones start imposing those strange urges onto us.

But our parents know our personality and have observed our behaviour for some twenty years or so —and after all, most of our personality comes from them anyway. So I agree that a parent could make a better decision in choosing a lifetime partner.
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At the end of the day, like attracts like. That's all I have to say on the matter.
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Before I respond to that, I'll have to take an extra-strength vitamin duh.

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So....... who wants to get married and live happily ever after?
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I'd be happy if I could keep a boyfriend for longer than a month...
A man can be happy with any woman as long as he does not love her. - Oscar Wilde
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^ I couldn't keep either of mine for over four years.

So I don't what's going to happen when all the kids rush into marriage when they're given permission next year or so
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Before I respond to that, I'll have to take an extra-strength vitamin duh.

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Oh well. The lawyers will be making a killing. One person I know has already set up a company dealing in same-sex divorce. Website and everything. It's hilarious.
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