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House of Reps votes againstequality

Australia’s House of Representatives has just voted on Stephen Jones’ Private Members Bill for marriage equality – only 42 MPs voted in favour, with 98 against.

Among those who voted in favour of the Bill were Tanya Plibersek, Craig Thomson, Andrew Wilkie, Adam Bandt, Rob Oakeshott, Bill Shorten, Peter Garrett, Nicola Roxon, Jenny Macklin, Stephen Smith and Anthony Albanese, who said in an interview after the vote that one day when the measure does pass, people will wonder what all the fuss was about.

Voting against were Julia Gillard, Tony Abbott, Kevin Rudd, Malcolm Turnbull, Joe Hockey, Bob Katter, Wayne Swan, Tony Windsor and Craig Emerson among many others.

Here’s a complete list of who voted for and against.

Labor MP Stephen Jones, who championed the Bill, said he was disappointed but suggested supporters of marriage equality “maintain your rage,” adding that the measure will go through within a few years.

Though there are other Bills before Federal Parliament, including being debated in the Senate this week, many supporters of marriage equality realise the chances of any advancing are slim at this stage.

But with several states – including Tasmania, South Australia, ACT, Victoria, Western Australia and now New South Wales – now will their own efforts to legalise same-sex marriage, some believe gay couples will be marrying on Australian soil by the end of the year.

“Even though the House of Representatives has voted down marriage equality 98 to 42, more MPs have chosen the right side of history than ever before and we are confident support will only grow,” points out marriage equality advocate Alex Greenwich.

“The reasoned speeches in favour, and the extremist statements against, will help to ensure the next time this issue is voted on there will be far more support for equality.”

“Now the federal parliament has effectively brushed the wishes of a majority of Australians aside, the states and territories will take the lead, making me confident we will see same-sex marriages performed somewhere in Australia by the end of the year.”

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Pollyfilla

Pollyfilla said on the 19th Sep, 2012

Proof that just over 2/3rds of Australians MP's are FUCKED in the head.
May your names go down in history as complete asswipes who voted AGAINST equality and change.

Ethan4L

Ethan4L said on the 19th Sep, 2012

Disappointing, but nothing new at this point.

Just keep coming back again and again, bigotry always crumbles in the face of equality; no matter how many years it takes.

moose6969

moose6969 said on the 19th Sep, 2012

I think that the Parliament should put the vote to the Australian public in a referendum, and see what the public think.

Ibby

Ibby said on the 19th Sep, 2012

It's called the House of Representatives but they're pushing forward a clearly unrepresentative view.

False advertising much?

CeeAy

CeeAy said on the 19th Sep, 2012

Fucked up and pissed off - not much more to say!

DavoJimbo

DavoJimbo said on the 19th Sep, 2012

don't see Penny Wong's name.... I wonder if malcom turnbull would guarantee a conscious vote? looks like 10 members didn't vote

Wonderland

Wonderland said on the 19th Sep, 2012

Politicians of Oz, what are you doing??? You are NOT representing the australians but are serving your own fucked up agendas!!! The majority of you is in favour of discrimination, you sick bastards!!!

How fucking difficult is it to join the list of countries with marriage equality?????

Australia's politicians are turning your beautiful country into a CUNTry people!!!

Excuse my foul language. :(

mark_

mark_ said on the 19th Sep, 2012



My representatives in the Federal and State parliament visit my suburb for a token two hour personal appearance once every twelve months. I ask them about this and both have told me they might visit if I organise some function which will be of advantage to them.

local_warming

local_warming said on the 19th Sep, 2012



penny wong is in the senate - this vote was in the house of representatives.

local_warming

local_warming said on the 19th Sep, 2012

It's called the House of Representatives but they're pushing forward a clearly unrepresentative view.

False advertising much?

If you look at it like that, support for the carbon tax legislation and mining tax legislation was passed with under 50% public support, making that legislation "unrepresentative"

JayTee

JayTee said on the 19th Sep, 2012



My Federal MPs claim to fame is complaining in parliament about the parliament house cafeteria prices after his wife complained to him about it.

and he got voted in again after that fiasco. isn't democracy great!

Stephen Lee

Stephen Lee said on the 19th Sep, 2012

It will definitely happen - the fight goes on....

andycol

andycol said on the 19th Sep, 2012

Its profoundly disappointing, BUT we will never quit! NEVER! Time to get back on the pony (no pun intended, but nice sentiment) and start again.

JayTee

JayTee said on the 19th Sep, 2012

i wonder how many people actually contacted their local MP before and after the vote in order to express their view.

Note: The "after" option is still open!

Irene

Irene said on the 19th Sep, 2012

Only 31 of 72 in the ALP voted for it. The Libs had no free choice.

potterfan

potterfan said on the 19th Sep, 2012

I want to just point out, this doesn't mean that 2/3 of aussies are against gay marriage, polls have shown it to be the opposit... this shows that politicians don't listen to the people who vote for them once they get their precious seat

JayTee

JayTee said on the 19th Sep, 2012



so less than half the people who were allowed to vote with their "conscience" voted for the motion.

we should keep this figure in mind the next time we think about voting for the ALP.

Irene

Irene said on the 19th Sep, 2012

Oops. Typo. 39 out of 72. Point remains though JayTee. Just a majority, by no means overwhelming as it should have been.
Adam Bandt, Andrew Wilkie & Rob Oakeshott who are neither lib or lab voted for it.

wysi

wysi said on the 19th Sep, 2012

well i'm not surprised. they passed the Carbon Fucking Tax, what else can you expect from these Honourable Members?

CeeAy

CeeAy said on the 19th Sep, 2012

i wonder how many people actually contacted their local MP before and after the vote in order to express their view.

Note: The "after" option is still open!

Too right JayTee - get your voices heard - do something!! Don't be passive.

Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed - Martin Luther King

Spooky

Spooky said on the 19th Sep, 2012

STOP THE PRESSES: Gina Rinehart has just come out as a Lesbian so the House of Representatives is going to recast the vote. Probably now overwhelmingly in favor!!!!

JayTee

JayTee said on the 19th Sep, 2012



There's hope for them yet!

Asherbella

Asherbella said on the 19th Sep, 2012

I'm disappointed marriage equality is not a priority for Canberra.
I feel like a second class citizen and that makes me feel uncomfortable.
I admire Penny Wong's comments regarding marriage equality and respect her greatly.

Above and beyond that I don't have much else to say. Everybody here knows how I feel about marriage equality. Something is missing, though. Mutual respect. The House of Representatives don't respect gay and lesbian rights. Marriage, I believe is a human right because love is essentially a human emotion, state of being and behaviour that needs to be validated. Why? Love is the meaning of life. It's why we're all here.

mark_

mark_ said on the 19th Sep, 2012

I suppose all you haters will start hating this man now.

The gay Liberal senator Dean Smith spoke against the bill, saying opinion in the gay community was divided.

''By not agreeing to same-sex marriage, I'm not choosing to endorse discrimination against my fellow gay and lesbian Australians, or to be disrespectful to their domestic relationships … instead for me, it's an honest acknowledgment of the special and unique characteristics of the union described as marriage,'' he said.

Senator Smith said while he was a man of faith, religious considerations had not influenced his thinking on the issue.

http://www.smh.com.au/national/samesex-debate-now-shifts-to-states-20120919-2672d.html

http://www.outinperth.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/DeanSmith-colour.jpg

Barrin

Barrin said on the 20th Sep, 2012


I feel like a second class citizen and that makes me feel uncomfortable.


So you want to be first class? Good luck with that. But if this is about equality we should be getting rid of class distinctions, not yearning to ascend them.

JayTee

JayTee said on the 20th Sep, 2012

I find it interesting that so many gay people think that gay marriage becoming law will make us first class citizens.

We won't be first class citizens for a long long time to come. Most of us will never be first class citizens in our lifetime because of the society we grew up in and all the slings and arrows of homophobia we had to endure will still be with us - impacting us for the rest of our lives because our development has been stunted at critical points in adolescence.

It is no coincidence that gay men have a tendency to have short lived relationships and for our community to have enormus problems with cigarrettes, alcohol and drugs. We also have a much higher rate of anxiety and depression. This is bourne out of our day to day interactions with a homophobic society and are compounded from the day we are born. We are almost perpetually doomed to be adolescents for the rest of our lives.

These problems will not be overcome magically once gay marriage is legalised.

Sure there are a few lucky people who manage to overcome the inherent problems of homophobia, but they tend to be from the upper classes where their family's money has shielded them from the rat race we all have to run with the added baggage of a lifetime of homophobia.

Yes it is possible to let go of some of that baggage but it is very difficult to do when you have a new pile of homophobia to deal with every day.

Very few of us will actually reap the benefits of gay marriage. It will be for generations to come to reap those rewards.

ernesto_1

ernesto_1 said on the 20th Sep, 2012

jaytee let's sling arrows together

JayTee

JayTee said on the 20th Sep, 2012

I'll sling my arrows into your quiver.....

....see? Perpetual adolescence - ernesto and I have been making funny remarks about me f*cking him up the arse for years now, but still we play this game.

we are the Ross and Rachel of samesame

Wonderland

Wonderland said on the 20th Sep, 2012

I don't care if they're religious or anti-gay, it is about equality and nothing else. Plain and simple.

This decision means your government is in favour of discrimination. That is unacceptable in a western country.

CeeAy

CeeAy said on the 20th Sep, 2012

I don't care if they're religious or anti-gay, it is about equality and nothing else. Plain and simple.

This decision means your government is in favour of discrimination. That is unacceptable in a western country.

Too right! This is legalised discrimination by a parliament who is elected by the people to represent the people and where the people - at least 64% of that electorate support gay marriage - something is very wrong in Australia. You have a forward thinking society and you have a backward thinking and behaving government. What are you guys going to do about it? Don't just stand there.

Some food for thought - don't be silent - words from Martin Luther King:
"To be silent is to acknowledge, to positively reinforce."

"The ultimate tragedy is not the oppression and cruelty by the bad people but the silence over that by the good people."

"Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter."

"We will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends."

"Man's inhumanity to man is not only perpetrated by the vitriolic actions of those who are bad. It is also perpetrated by the vitiating inaction of those who are good."

Wonderland

Wonderland said on the 20th Sep, 2012

Too right! This is legalised discrimination by a parliament who is elected by the people to represent the people and where the people - at least 64% of that electorate support gay marriage - something is very wrong in Australia. You have a forward thinking society and you have a backward thinking and behaving government. What are you guys going to do about it? Don't just stand there.

Some food for thought - don't be silent - words from Martin Luther King:
"To be silent is to acknowledge, to positively reinforce."

"The ultimate tragedy is not the oppression and cruelty by the bad people but the silence over that by the good people."

"Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter."

"We will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends."

"Man's inhumanity to man is not only perpetrated by the vitriolic actions of those who are bad. It is also perpetrated by the vitiating inaction of those who are good."

Ain't that the truth!

I love Martin Luther King. Coretta was cool too. They were good people.
To battle evil with goodness is so powerful.

JayTee

JayTee said on the 20th Sep, 2012

If we were Muslims there'd be riots in the streets this weekend.

Whilst riots aren't good for public relations, you can bet your bottom's dollar that there will be plenty of $$$$$ forked out to Muslim organizations to run programs for their youth so they feel less disenfranchised from mainstream australia (just like happened after the cronulla riots).

No such prize for our youth.

mark_

mark_ said on the 20th Sep, 2012


No Coretta was more cool. Kaneesha's cool.

Wonderland

Wonderland said on the 20th Sep, 2012

If we were Muslims there'd be riots in the streets this weekend.

Whilst riots aren't good for public relations, you can bet your bottom's dollar that there will be plenty of $$$$$ forked out to Muslim organizations to run programs for their youth so they feel less disenfranchised from mainstream australia (just like happened after the cronulla riots).

No such prize for our youth.

We need more gay muslims.
At least there would be some dancing during the riots and the participants would be much nicer dressed!

JayTee

JayTee said on the 20th Sep, 2012

And hotter guys available.

chad_74

chad_74 said on the 20th Sep, 2012

the problem is the politicians fear being excommunicated more than the wrath of voters probably cause Australians are too passive.
Any politician that has religious reasons for not voting for anything should not be in parliament.They are there to represent us all not the catholic church.this vote is a warning to us all.we must not allow abbott, Hockey ,Turnbull,Albanese,Rudd... to gain anymore power as we will be plunged into our own dark ages and homosexuality will again become a criminal offence.

CeeAy

CeeAy said on the 20th Sep, 2012

the problem is the politicians fear being excommunicated more than the wrath of voters probably cause Australians are too passive.
Any politician that has religious reasons for not voting for anything should not be in parliament.They are there to represent us all not the catholic church.this vote is a warning to us all.we must not allow abbott, Hockey ,Turnbull,Albanese,Rudd... to gain anymore power as we will be plunged into our own dark ages and homosexuality will again become a criminal offence.

100% agree Chad - which one of these MPs who voted along religious lines claimed to be so religious when they were running in an election. Not many I bet. They are indeed there to represent the majority view of their constituency. They are not in parliament to vote along any of their personal lines or beliefs – they are not there to launch their own personal crusade – in theory anyway!

mark_

mark_ said on the 20th Sep, 2012

It's good to see who voted but the using the word 'love' in the slogan makes it adolescent, IMO

http://sphotos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/185111_499030453457819_1666226429_n.jpg

JayTee

JayTee said on the 20th Sep, 2012




I don't know about that.

I think somtimes politicians need to lead. That means going aganst the wishes of their constituents (but accepting the consequences of their leadership when voters kick them out at election time if they are dissatisfied with the results).

The marriage equality vote was one such time that they should've led. Peter Garrett did it. His little band of ALP members in his electorate kicked up quite a fuss when he announced he was going to vote for change.

I think that most of the people pictured above are not so mich worried about what voters think - more that they might lose pre selection at the next election because their local party members don't like em.

Australian voters on the whole are pretty stupid. They think it's a 2 party race and that's what the ALP and Libs are counting on. Why lead on divisive issues and lose preselection when the voters are just going to vote for the party and not the person?

I'm interested to know who on these forums actually contacted their local mp to express their view to them regarding this issue?

I'm betting not many. No wonder pollies think they can treat us all like crap.

CeeAy

CeeAy said on the 20th Sep, 2012

It's good to see who voted but the using the word 'love' in the slogan makes it adolescent, IMO

http://sphotos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/185111_499030453457819_1666226429_n.jpg

I can guarantee you one thing - all these fuckers will end up on the wrong side of history - discriminators and backward! They will go down in history as part of the oppressors of equality and violators of human rights!

DavoJimbo

DavoJimbo said on the 21st Sep, 2012

we need to rid ourselves of tony abbott.... this would be the first step we can take. I think Turnbull would give them a conscious vote - that would in turn rid of us juliar, too - all good things

cubbyxface

cubbyxface said on the 21st Sep, 2012

good ole wedge politics. IMHO, a big part of the problem is that this is not a make or break issue for the majority of hetrosexuals in favour of same-sex marriage. let's face it, they are the majority, so political parties pander for their vote.

Now on the other hand, a large proportion of opponents to same-sex marriage view this as an important factor in who has their vote at the next election, so i'm not at all suprised to see this motion voted down.

personally i think there's a better chance of same-sex marriage with a progressive thinking liberal (ie malcolm turnbull) rather than a labor govt (regardless of the faction of the PM) cos of politics. just look at the uk, u have the tories "promising" to introduce same-sex marriage before the next election. my hypothesis is that it's so they can steal some votes from the political left and the ppl in opposition to same-sex marriage would be reluctant to put in a "protest vote" cos they've had enuf of new labour.

then again, i bet things would be different if labor/greens held a huge majority in parliament

chad_74

chad_74 said on the 21st Sep, 2012

Is it not strange all the political partys have ganged up on homosexuals by not immediately doing a civil unions vote?
Turnbull was all for civil unions beforehand but now is not , Abbott says civil unions are a state matter but voted to overturn them under howard and rudd when tasmania and NT did it.What we need is an extremist that will blow the bastards in parliament up so we can start over fresh.

CeeAy

CeeAy said on the 21st Sep, 2012



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